Connective Tissue – Articles and Resources

Books:

Myofascial Release: The Search for Excellence–A Comprehensive Evaluatory and Treatment Approach (A Comprehensive

 Evaluatory and Treatment Approach)– By John Barnes creator of the Myofascial Release method

Anatomy Trains: Myofascial Meridians for Manual and Movement Therapists – by Thomas Myers.  Puts together the many different myofascial connections and make it very clear how our bodies are really connected.

The Myofascial Release Manual – Great handbook that really explains the history of myofascial release and the many disciplines as well as how to do myofascial release

Job’s Body: A Handbook for Bodywork (Third Edition)– the definitive handbook on the body that reads more like a novel.

The Endless Web: Fascial Anatomy and Physical Reality

DVD’s

Beginning Myofascial Release DVD~ Sean Riehl

Advanced Myofascial Release DVD~ Sean Riehl

Deep Tissue Massage and Myofascial Release: A Video Guide to Techniques– Art Riggs

Articles Online:

The Science of Massage Soft-tissue Techniques By Cathy Ulrich.  Massage and Bodywork Magazine
Metamembrane #3: The Connective Tissue as Metamembrane

Anatomist’s Corner By Thomas Myers Massage and Bodywork MagazineKey elements of connective tissue massage By John Latz AMTA Journal

Discovering the Mastery in the Art of Connective Tissue Massage, Part One By John Latz Massage Today

Discovering Mastery in the Art of Connective Tissue Massage, Part II By John Latz

The Amazing Fascial Web, Part I By Leon Chaitow, ND, DO Massage Today

The Amazing Fascial Web, Part II By Leon Chaitow, ND, DO Massage Today

Connective tissue cells are lousy at contraction, so-so as conductors, but they secrete and amazing variety of products into the intercellular space that contribute to our bones, cartilage, ligaments, tendons.  In other words, it is these cells which create the surroundings for all of the others, building the strong, pliable ‘stuff’ which holds us together, forming the shared and communicative environment for all our cells-what Varela termed a form of ‘exo-symbiosis’- shaping us and allowing us directed movement.  -Tom Myers, Anatomy Trains

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